Friday, October 29, 2010

Podcast of Ilya Barabanov's Talk At the Columbia Journalism School

On October 25, 2010, Ilya Barabanov, 2010 Winner of the Peter Mackler Award for Courageous and Ethical Journalism, addressed students at the prestigious Columbia University Journalism School. Barabanov discussed the situation of independent press in Russia today, and highlighted the particular challenges faced by his publication, The New Times.

Barabanov, deputy editor of The New Times, received the award at a ceremony held October 22, 2010 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Keynote speaker David E. Hoffman, contributing editor to the Washington Post and Foreign Policy Magazine, and the Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Dead Hand, called Barabanov "An example of what has gone right with Russia since the collapse of communism."

Listen to the Podcast here.

Photo: Ilya Barabanov (left) and Alexander Osipovich (right) speaking at the Columbia Journalism School.

Thursday, October 28, 2010

2010 Award Ceremony Recap - Ilya Barabanov Receives Peter Mackler Award

As he stood before a packed room of journalists and DC insiders on October 22, 2010, Ilya Barabanov called on his colleagues to speak about not only the most tragic examples of violence against journalists in his native Russia, but to remember all of those who have suffered because they pursued their profession. "Each and every one of these incidents is connected to a very real human tragedy, disastrous for our colleague, his friends and family. Today, standing here at this podium, I would like to call upon you to pay attention to all of these cases." said Barabanov, the deputy editor of the Russian News Weekly The New Times.

Barabanov was awarded the 2010 Peter Mackler Award for Courageous and Ethical Journalism at a ceremony held at the National Press Club last Friday. Barabanov, who flew in from Moscow for the ceremony, was named this year's winner not only for his work exposing corruption within the Russian government, but also for his courage in defending his profession's right to do so. While introducing Barabanov, Peter Mackler Award Project Director Camille Mackler stated that "By getting up and going to work every day, Ilya shows more courage than any of us will probably be called to display during our life time ... Ilya's work reminds us that the principles of a free press can never be compromised."

During his acceptance speech, Barabanov spoke about the difficulties faced by journalists in Russia, but also noted that for independent media journalists, "our work gives us great pleasure. Being an investigative journalist in a country whose state authorities do everything to prevent such activity, is perhaps more interesting than working in an environment free of such obstacles."

Russia, which recently ranked number 140 on Reporters Without Borders' 2010 Press Freedom Index, is generally viewed as being at a cross roads regarding press freedom. Clothilde Le Coz, Director of Reporters Without Borders - USA, told guests at the ceremony that "in a country where being a reporter too often rhymes with renouncing your freedom, Ilya is part of the young generation of reporters who are fighting back for change." Nonetheless, violence, harassment, and intimidation of journalists whose opinions do not align with the Kremlin continues to be rampant as the perpetrators remain able to act with impunity.

David E. Hoffman, the evening's keynote speaker, also deplored the situation in Russia. "Russia today is not the Soviet Union. It is not an absolute dictatorship. Rather, Russia is at a crossroads. After communism, it did not develop as a full democracy. It has gone backwards in recent years." Hoffman, a contributing editor to the Washington Post and Foreign Policy Magazine, is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Dead Hand, a look at the arms' race during the Cold War. He also served as Moscow Bureau Chief for the Washington Post and spoke of his own friends and experiences when describing the dangers faced by journalists in Russia. Hoffman also praised Barabanov's courage: "Ilya's investigations are a testament to the courage of all journalists in Russia who work against such terrible odds. This kind of work is not glamorous and not easy. There is a great deal of secrecy, threats, and coercion."

Hoffman concluded by praising Barabanov, telling him to "realize that your articles are part of making history in Russia, making a new society, building a new democracy. All around you it may seem like a dry desert - but you are a green shoot of grass. You are an example of what has gone right with Russia since the collapse of communism."

2009 winner, J. S. Tissainayagam, also spoke at the ceremony, praising the work of the Peter Mackler Award and stating that the existence of such an award provides "solace and encouragement" to journalists who work in difficult situations, and helps shine a spotlight on the situations reporters face world wide. Tissainayagam was unable to personally accept his award last year, as he was serving a twenty-year prison sentence after having been falsely convicted on terrorism charges. After being granted a pardon, Tissainayagam arrived in the United States in June, 2010. This year's Peter Mackler Award Ceremony was Tissainayagam's first public speaking engagement since his release. Le Coz also praised Tissainayagam and his wife, Ronnate, saying that "it is great to see you tonight with your wife Ronnate, still determined to get the word out when it comes to Sri Lanka's sad reality."

Barabanov took advantage of his trip to the United States to meet with government officials and media outlets to speak about the situation of journalists in Russia. He granted interviews to Voice of America and Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty. Barabanov also participated in a Question & Answer session with students at Columbia University's Journalism School.

The Peter Mackler Award for Courageous and Ethical Journalism was founded in 2008 to honor the memory of Peter Mackler, a thirty-year career journalist who passed away June 20, 2008. The award is run jointly by the US branch of Reporters Without Borders and the Global Media Forum, a company founded by Mackler to provide journalism training.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Text of Remarks by Clothilde Le Coz During 2010 Peter Mackler Award Ceremony


Thank you all for being here tonight and joining us on this ceremony to honor Peter Mackler’s legacy. It is a very special event this year.

Tonight, you’ll hear from two very important journalists. I am very honored to have J.S. Tissainayagam speaking tonight. As some of you know, he was sentenced to 20 years in jail in Sri Lanka because of his journalistic work in 2009. This is the reason why he could not received the Peter Mackler Award he was awarded last year. But it is great to see you tonight with your wife Ronnate, still determined to get the word out when it comes to Sri Lankan sad reality. Journalists disappear and media are openly attacked. There is no way to investigate on any of these acts. The media are controlled by the government. Can you imagine that during the latest election, 97% of news program air-time was devoted to the president and his aides ? A voice like Tissa’s is of course not welcome. Especially when it comes to the Tamil minority. But you’ll hear more from him in just a few minutes.

As a journalist myself, I am amazed and impressed by the work of Ilya Barabanov. In a country where being a reporter too often rhymes with renouncing your freedom, Ilya is part of the young generation of reporters who are fighting back for change. No longer than a month ago, armed and masked police officers went on a 3 hour raid to The New Times, to disclose the sources of one of his interview. Of course, they are still looking for them. But The New Times is no exception. In the past year, the same happened to at least 4 newsrooms in Moscow.

Russia is not known for press freedom. Most Russians get their news via TV but have very little chance of hearing independent views on it. Opposition figures and government critics have no access to nationwide stations.

Murders of journalists and human rights activists and physical attacks on them, especially in the Caucasus republics, make Russia one of the world’s most dangerous countries for independent journalists.

For more than 25 years, Reporters Without Borders has been fighting for press freedom. Tonight just shows us how useful that is. As a reporter, it is an honor to be in front of them, standing up and fighting for their own rights everyday. They are not only reporters. They are examples, role models and heroes. Even if they will be too humble to admit it.

Text of Remarks by Ilya Barabanov, 2010 Peter Mackler Award Winner, During This Year's Ceremony


Dear Colleagues,

I would like to begin by giving thanks to the Peter Mackler Foundation, Reporters Without Borders, and the Global Media Forum all of whom took part in awarding me with the prestigious 2010 Peter Mackler Award. I am grateful to the director of the Peter Mackler Award, Camille J. Mackler, as well as the entire Mackler family, to the Secretary General of Reporters Without Borders, Jean-Francois Julliard, and also to David Hoffman, who voiced so many kind words today. I would never have received this award if not for my colleagues at The New Times magazine, and I would like to express special thanks to Irena Lesnevskaya, the magazine published and owner, and our Editor-in-Chief, Yevgenia Albats.

The New Times appeared on the Russian media-market four years ago, in February of 2007. Irena Lesnevskaya stated her desire to begin such a project immediately after the murder of Novaya Gazeta reporter Anna Politkovskaya back then in an interview.

Naturally, it would have been more satisfying and fulfilling for me and my colleagues to work if Russia had a more developed news media market: only in the face of lively competition can publications grow, develop and progress. However, we have to admit, that all the independent media sources can be counted on the fingers of not two, but even just one hand.

Aside from The New Times, among them is the well-known Novaya Gazeta, the radio station Echo Moskvy, as well as a number of developing internet publications. Unfortunately, just a few days ago the Russian Newsweek ceased publishing, causing the number of political journals to drop even lower.

Often times, The New Times has been mistakenly identified and referred to as an "opposition" publication. Indeed, over the past ten years, an unhelpful notion has developed that any media outlet which allows itself to write about politics, without adjusting its position to that of the Kremlin, is by definition "in opposition." Yet this is incorrect. The position of our magazine is that we simply support the right of citizens to information. This right is guaranteed in the Russian Constitution and, in the United States, as far as I know, it is the First Amendment to the Constitution. We do not take any sides, and attempt to be equally critical of both the representatives of the ruling elite, and to those who call themselves political opponents of the regime in Russia. We are ready to provide a platform for all parties in any discussion, and, whether we are writing a political piece of conducting a financial investigation, we are always interested in both sides of the argument.

Investigative journalism, in particular, is a genre that The New Times specializes in. In our very first issue, we published an investigation of the murder of a Russian special agent, Aleksandr Litvinenko, who was murdered in the fall of 2006. The magazine is constantly publishing articles exposing corruption in various government agencies of Russia. My own most recent investigations are concerned with corruption within the Ministry of Internal Affairs - Russian police - and the Federal Security Service, a successor to the KGB.

My colleague at The New Times, and a very dear friend, Natalia Morari, was conducting for quite some time an investigation of the murder of a high ranked official of the Russian Central Bank - Andrei Kozlov. His death was linked to the struggle he led against "cash pushers" - officials and criminals engaged in money laundering. For her courageous articles, Natalia was expelled from Russia in December 2007. Natalia, who is a citizen of the Republic of Moldova, was denied entry to Russia, which declared her to be a national security threat. Any and all attempts made to challenge this decision through the legal system have been fruitless, but we continue to fight for her return.

Even with the use of such harsh methods, the enemies of independent press have yet to break down or intimidate those journalists who truly believe in honestly executing their duty before the citizens of their country.

But I am not complaining. My colleagues and I derive great pleasure simply from the opportunity to practice investigative journalism in Russia, despite the fact that the nature of our jobs presents certain difficulties. We are not, by any means, in despair, and Natalia Morari, who, for the past three years, has not been permitted to enter Russia, has become one of the most recognizable television reporters in her home country. If any of you follow the happenings of the former Soviet Union, then you are probably aware of Natalia's activity especially in connection with the famous Twitter-revolution which occurred in Chisinau about a year ago, and resulted in the end of the communist rule in Moldova and the commencement of clean and legitimate elections in which democratic parties were able to participate and gain support.

I would like to use this opportunity to take a moment to highlight the situation which has developed in Russia with regards to independent media. The International Press Institute demonstrated that the first nine years of the new millennium 735 journalists were killed. Thirty-five of those were in Russia. Only a month ago, at the request of The New Times, Russia's Glasnost Defense Foundation conducted its own investigation, the results of which, I must admit, shocked us. We discovered that over the past five years in sixty-six of eighty-three regions in Russia (that is almost eighty percent) journalists were either killed or crippled. Over seventy percent of the regions (sixty-one to be exact) journalists were faced with criminal charges. In forty-three regions (fifty percent), censorship is a natural occurrence. Contrary to popular opinion, the most dangerous place for journalists to work, are not the republics of North Caucasus, but the central Russian cities - Moscow and St. Petersburg. Researchers found a complete lack of incidents of government pressure on journalists only in 5 Russian regions.

However, even these numbers are due only to the fact that in such places as Chukotka, the Magadan or Tambov regions any and all independent media were silenced earlier, and hence, in the past ten years, there simply haven't been any journalists who would allow themselves to speak out critically against the local authorities. Unfortunately, the international journalistic community becomes aware of only the most notorious of these tragedies. This, in my opinion, is completely unacceptable. Annual human rights advocacy monitorings gather only dry statistics: The updated number of journalists killed, in jail and fired for their alternative views. But each and every one of these incidents is connection to a very real human tragedy, disastrous for our colleague, his friends and family. Today, standing here at this podium, I would like to call upon you to pay attention to all of these cases.

And lastly... yes, the reality is that independent media outlets are not able to feel safe in Russia. But of course, this is not news for any journalists working in countries with authoritarian regimes. Most importantly, of course, is that our work gives us great pleasure. Being an investigative journalist in a country whose state authorities do everything to prevent such activity, is perhaps more interesting than working in an environment free of such obstacles. Furthermore, just by the rise in our sales we see that our readers need us. Based on ratings from September, The New Times has become the most quoted Russian magazine in the country, surpassing, for the first time even Forbes, which always held a firm first place in this report due to their publications of the ratings of the richest people in Russia. Is is all the more wonderful to realize that by doing your duty, you are helping ordinary citizens who have found themselves in difficult situations as well as our society as a whole. My countrymen will inevitably realize that a normal and comfortable life is impossible in our country without the presence of independent media outlets.

Thank you.

Text of Remarks by David E. Hoffman During 2010 PMA Ceremony


I worked in Russia in the 1990s, and I remember well the violence. In those first years after the Soviet Union collapsed, the rule of law - so essential in a democracy - did not exist. Without enforceable laws and courts that functioned impartially, disputes were settled with coercion and violence.

I know that it became fashionable to say this was ll Boris Yeltsin's fault, that Russian was chaos in the 1990s. But the truth is that the fault was much deeper - many people don't' realize this, but in those first years, the laws of the Soviet Union were changed only gradually. Entrepreneurship was against the law in Soviet times. When the country disappeared, there was the dawn of a new system but a lawless space. It took several years to just pass a law on how private enterprise companies could function. Yeltsin certainly is to blame for this - he didn't build rule of law fast or carefully enough - but it is important to understand that this was a vacuum , a space without rule of law.

At first it was the businessmen who were victims, but soon it became the journalists too. When I look down the lists of the journalists who have died int he line of duty, I see some who were my friends and sources in the 1990s.

Two in particular stand out.

Valery Ivanov was a courageous editor of the Togliatti Review and provided me and my researcher then with a great deal of valuable material about the workings of Aftovaz, a huge auto factory there. Ivanov was gunned down April 29, 2002. His assailants have never been caught.

The other was my friend and colleague Ivan Safronov. Ivan had served in the rocket forces and he helped me with some very important stories, including the one about the 1983 false alarm that opens my book The Dead Hand. Ivan was a tall, strapping fellow and to this day I cannot believe that we know the full story of hi death on March 2, 2007, when he fell from a fourth floor staircase window.

Neither of these cases was adequately investigated.

And this lack of rule of law which I mentioned earlier persists now, almost two decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union. I know that both President Medvedev and then-President Putin have paid lip-service to establishing the rule of law. Remember that Putin promised "diktatura zakon," or dictatorship of law, whatever that means, and Medvedev promised to end "legal nihilism," but the fact is they have not.

Rule of law means that no one is above the law. But we see now that some people in Russia think they are above the law. We see it in the reaction to Ilya's recent article exposing the Moscow riot police and their methods.

Ilya's investigations are a testament to the courage of all journalists in Russia who work against such terrible odds. This kind of work is not glamorous and not easy. There is a great deal of secrecy, threats, and coercion.

And there must be days, many days, when you ask yourself, Ilya, is it worth it? Why do this? Why get up every day and go out to ask these difficult questions and put yourself at risk?

And I am sure that there are days when you must ask, if Russia has been without rule of law for two decades of post-Soviet history, what will the next two decades bring? If this is what Russia inherited after seven decades of Soviet rule, then was it really worth it, all this effort to end the Soviet system? Will things ever change?

Ilya, and to all of us, I want to say, yes. It is worth it, and here is why.

What the Soviet Union lacked was a functioning civil society. Civil society is the glue, or the sinews, that connect the rulers and the ruled in a democracy. In the Soviet Union, the Communist Part and it extinguished any other organization or person - there was no oxygen for others.

Now since the Soviet collapse, there have been some new green shoots of grass growing up - there has been a change. There is some oxygen. Russia today is not the Soviet Union. It is not an absolute dictatorship. Rather, Russia is at a crossroads. After communism, it did not develop as a full democracy. It has gone backwards in recent years.

But I think we should not entirely despair about the press in Russia today. The New Times has 50,000 readers and about 300,000 visitors a month to its web site. The magazine is distributed in all the major cities of Russia, and winds up on the desk of Putin and Medvedev.

In fact there is a fair measure of press independence today in the non-government media - print, radio, Internet and some television. Some do their best to expose the government while others are openly analytical or carry angry opinions.

These are tender green shoots of civil society. They have not been extinguished. Now they are small; they are often struggling - the New Times has difficulty gaining advertising - and they are easily intimidated. But fortunately they are surviving.

Meanwhile, the big media, such as state television, commands a huge audience. The big media are controlled by the state and don't make waves.

When the small independent press makes noise, it is often ignored by the authorities. Scandals can be uncovered, but no one reacts. The powers either ignore it or intimidate it.

There is no link - no glue - no sinews - between the rulers and the ruled.

But this is not so much the fault of journalism. It is bigger than just journalism. Much bigger.

The rulers have sucked up the oxygen for free politics.

They have failed to build a rule of law.

Moreover, there is a certain passivity among your readers today. People are focused on personal freedoms and standard of living. They do not protests against the authorities. My good friend Masha Lipman has written, "the atomization and passivity of Russian society makes matters worse.. even the advanced and critically-minded audiences of alternative news outlets do not take action and do not seem to mind that the government keeps them from participating in national affairs."

This is not a healthy situation. It is not good to have rulers who are not accountable to the ruled. It is not good to have a people who are indifferent to these kind of rulers.

But the situation is not hopeless.

When society changes - and I think it will - they will need you, Ilya. That is why you should get up every morning eager to continue your work. To use some stale words from another era, you are the vanguard, you are a pioneer! Everyone else will come. You need to be there for the day when civil society and rule of law will be created.

I cannot say how long it will take, but inevitably the courage of your work will feed a feeling among people that something must be done.

So realize that your articles are part of making history in Russia, making a new society, building a new democracy. All around you it may seem like a dry desert - but you are a green shoot of grass. You are an example of what has gone right with Russia since the collapse of communism.

Don't give up!

Saturday, October 23, 2010

Russian Journalist Receives Peter Mackler Award

Russian Journalist Receives Peter Mackler Award (AFP)

WASHINGTON — Russian journalist Ilya Barabanov praised the dozens of colleagues who have lost their lives over the past decade as he accepted the Peter Mackler Award for courageous journalism.

"Today standing here at this podium I would like to call upon you to pay attention to all of these cases," Barabanov, deputy editor of Novoye Vremya (New Times), said in an acceptance speech at the National Press Club.

"It is the reality of Russia now that independent media outlets are not able to feel safe," he said. "But that's not really news to any journalist working in countries with authoritarian regimes." Read more...

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Peter Mackler Award Winner to Speak at Columbia School of Journalism

Ilya Barabanov, 25, winner of the 2010 Peter Mackler Award for Courageous and Ethical Journalism, will speak at a Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism on Monday October 25, 2010 at 5:30 PM. Details of the event can be found on the school's website. The event is open to the public, RSVP is requested.

Barabanov was named this year's winner of the Peter Mackler Award on August 22, 2010 and will be formally awarded at a ceremony October 22, 2010 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Barabanov joined The New Times in January 2007 as a political correspondent and investigative journalist. He is currently the deputy and political editor for the weekly magazine. Barabanov has also authored several investigative pieces on corruption and other questionable practices within Russian government agencies. As a result, Barabanov has been the target of attempted extortion plots.

In April, 2010, Barabanov contributed to a story alleging corrupt practices and forced labor of migrant workers within OMON, an elite police force. The story, “The Slaves of OMON,” created a scandal within the Moscow police force and prompted a libel suit against The New Times. To date, two attempted searches have been conducted in The New Times’ editorial offices in a bid to identify the article’s sources. The second search, a raid by hooded men carrying weapons, came on September 2, 2010. Barabanov has denounced the raids as illegal.