Thursday, December 26, 2013

Malaysia Censoring 'No Fire Zone,' An Attack On Art - Index On Censorship




Index on Censorship (IoC) has highlighted five cases of artistes attacked in 2013 for their performances as an infringement on their freedom of expression. However, while four of the five cases are of intolerant governments and militants groups trying to silence critical voices of performers in their own countries, one instance is different.

Lena Hendry is a programme officer for the non-profit KOMAS in Kuala Lampur Malaysia, but could be imprisoned and fined if found guilty by the Malaysian courts for the private screening of No Fire Zone, a documentary on the massacre of Tamil civilians in Sri Lanka during the final few months of the civil war ending in May 2009.



The other four cases highlighted by IoC are: Weld El 15 (aka Yaacoub) the Tunisian rapper arrested and sentenced for two years for posting an online song ‘Police are Dogs’ and later released on a six-month suspended sentence;  Kazakh poet Aaron Atabek sentenced to 18 years in prison for protesting the demolition of a shanty town and later put in solitary confinement for smuggling out poetry of protest while in detention; death threats by Islamic militants on 12,000 singers and musicians in Mali that has put them out of work, closed theatres and forced some to flee overseas; 19 actors in the city of El Kef in Tunisia assaulted by Salafi militants and later arrested by the police on charges of indecency that carries a sentence of six months incarceration.

This blog featured in previous posts the cases of Lena Hendry and Weld El 15.

However, the Weld El 15 case posted was not on his arrest for his online song ‘Police are Dogs’ but for another conviction in September for a concert performance in Hammemet with fellow-rapper Klay BBJ (aka Ahamed Ben Ahamed).

Lena Hendry was arrested by Malaysian police. On July 3, a private screening before an invited audience of No Fire Zone was co-organised by Pusat KOMAS, the Malaysian human rights NGO and KL & Selangor Chinese Assembly Hall Civil Right Committee. Before the event the organisers received a fax from the Sri Lankan High Commission in Kuala Lampur asking it not be screened and accusing the organisers of supporting terrorism, said a Malaysian news website FMT.

The screening was disrupted midway by Malaysian officials of the home ministry and the police. Although they were persuaded to let the film continue, all members of the audience leaving the hall had their identity papers scrutinised. KOMAS, says in a press release, “This is a clear abuse of power as it was not necessary for them to harass the audience who had just come to watch the movie.”

Although Hendry was told to appear in court on August 6, the hearing was postponed to September 19.  On the 19th Hendry was charged under Film Censorship Act but it unclear whether others were too.  “[to] ridiculously proceed with this travesty of justice by the charging of Lena Hendry is evident of the KDN and the AG Chambers’ bully tactics and total disregard of universal human rights principles and worse of all, the Malaysian Constitution,” reported MSN.

Meanwhile in the Tunisian case, Weld El 15 was in hiding and did not appear in court in September when his fellow-performer Klay BBJ, first sentenced for 21 months in jail was given a reduced six-month sentence on appeal. The sentence was not overturned in appeal.

Following the sentence, BBC quoting AFP said that Klay told court, “‘[o]ur songs criticise the current situation in Tunisia and the government, no more and no less. I am among the rappers most critical of the government and that is why [the authorities] are after me.’”

IoC drawing attention to these five cases said, “Art is one of the most prominent forms of freedom of expression, allowing people to express their thoughts through song, dance, prose and theatre. It is not uncommon across the world for performers to be attacked as a form of censorship, ultimately silencing what they are trying to say.”

No comments:

Post a Comment